Arthur Rackham – part 2


Arthur Rackham (1867 – 1939) is widely regarded as one of the leading illustrators from the 'Golden Age' of British book illustration which encompassed the years from 1900 until the start of the First World War.

Arthur Rackham's works have become very popular since his death, both in North America and Britain. His images have been widely used by the greeting card industry and many of his books are still in print or have been recently available in both paperback and hardback editions. His original drawings and paintings are keenly sought at the major international art auction houses.

This is part 2 of an 8-part post on the works of Arthur Rackham. For full biographical notes, and for earlier works, see part 1 also.

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens is a novel by J. M. Barrie, published in 1906. It is one of four major literary works by Barrie featuring the widely known character he originated, Peter Pan. The story is set in Kensington Gardens, a famous park in London, mostly after "Lock-out Time", described by Barrie as the time at the end of the day when the park gates are closed to the public. After this time the fairies and other magical inhabitants of the park can move about more freely than during the daylight, when they must hide from ordinary people. The fairy inhabitants of the gardens are first described in Thomas Tickell’s 1722 poem Kensington Gardens.
This version originally published in 1906.

1906 Cover of Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens (later edition)

Now there arose a mighty storm...

The Kensington Gardens are in London...

The Lady with the Balloons...

In the Broad Walk you might meet all the people...

The Hump, which is part of the Broadwalk...

There is almost nothing that has such a keen sense of fun...

The Serpentine is a lovely lake...

The fairies of the Serpentine

The island on which all the birds are born...

Old Mr. Salford was a crab-apple of an old gentleman...

Away he flew...

The fairies have their tiffs with the birds.

When he heard Peter's voice...

A band of workmen...

Put his case before old Solomon Caw.

Peter screamed out...

A hundred flew off with the string...

… the birds said that they would help him no more...

"Preposterous!" cried Solomon in a rage.

For years he had been quietly filling his stocking.

When you meet grown-up people...

He passed under the bridge...

Fairies are all more or less in hiding until dusk.

When they think you are not looking...

…they stand quite still pretending to be flowers...

The fairies are exquisite dancers.

These trick fairies sometimes change the board...

Linkmen running in front carrying winter cherries.

When her Majesty wants to know the time.

The fairies sit round on mushrooms...

Butter is got from the roots of old trees...

Wallflower juice is good for reviving...

Peter Pan is the fairies orchestra.

They all tickled him on the shoulder.

One day they were overheard by a fairy.

The little people weave their summer curtains...

An afternoon when the gardens were white with snow.

She ran to St. Gover's Well and Hid.

An elderberry hobbled across the walk...

A chrysanthemum heard her...

They warned her.

Queen Mab, who rules in the Gardens.

Shook his bald head and murmered...

Fairies never say, "We feel happy"...

Looking very undancey indeed.

114 "My Lord Duke," said the physician...

Building the house for Mamie.

If the bad ones among the fairies happen to be out...

They will certainly mischief you.

…tombstones of Walter Matthews and Phoebe Phelps.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland(commonly shortened to Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. It tells of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. The tale plays with logic, giving the story lasting popularity with adults as well as children. It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre, and its narrative course and structure, characters and imagery have been enormously influential in both popular culture and literature.
This version originally published in 1907.

1907 Cover of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Title page

At this the whole pack rose up into the air, and came flying down upon her.

Who stole the tarts?

The Mock Turtle drew a long breath and said, "That's very curious"

The Queen never left off quarrelling with the other players.

The Queen turned angrily from him and said to the Knave, "Turn them over"

A Mad Tea Party

It grunted again so violently that she looked down into its face in some alarm.

An unusually large saucepan flew close by it, and very nearly carried it off.

Advice from a caterpillar.

Why, Mary Ann, what are you doing here?

They all crowded round it panting and asking, "But who has won?"

The pool of tears.

Alice in Wonderland.









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